Books

Our productivity depends on innovation, and innovation is driven by intense curiosity – the quest to find out: “Is there a way to do this better, cheaper or faster?” This type of question prompted Elon Musk to found SpaceX, Larry Page and Sergey Brin to start Google, Jeff Bezos to create Amazon, and Michael Dell to start Dell. Asking “Why” prompted Sean Moore to invent the Crescent Rod, a curved shower curtain rod; and four Harvard students to invent Soccket – a soccer ball that generates electrical power for underprivileged families through kinetic energy. In her book “The Power of Why” business journalist Amanda Lang reveals how asking “Why?” can fuel innovation and promote a spirit of inquiry in your workplace. She offers valuable insights and excellent case histories. Her findings have helped executives and people from all sorts of life to be innovative and productive. Read more →


Your written, verbal and nonverbal communication skills are instrumental, especially in today’s working environment. Nevertheless, many professionals make a number of common communication mistakes that damage their image and credibility, in addition to conveying an unintended and unclear message. The full expression of your message includes not only what you say, but also how you say it, and how you present yourself. You achieve true, accurate communication only when the other person understands what you mean exactly. Follow these 17 practical tips to overcome everyday speaking and presentation blunders. By removing these barriers, you will be able to work productively with people from different backgrounds, roles, and levels in the organization. Read more →


To achieve extraordinary results in both work and life, we must do two things: 1) turn our to-do-everything approach into a targeted “One Thing” approach, and 2) manage our time productively. Multitasking is not effective since success requires long periods of laser-focused concentration. If you find your “One Thing,” everything else will fall into place. In this article, I summarize seven recommendations based on his research and experience. These methods are helping managers and executives become more productive and create habits that build success. Read more →


We want employees to complete projects and tasks, and perhaps more importantly, we want them to learn the skills that make them more competent and more self-sufficient. Conversely, very few managers coach their employees on a regular basis. Of those who coach, few have the necessary skills to do it right. Most people think of coaching as an advice session. However, as Socrates figured out more than 2,000 years ago, a better strategy is to coach by asking intelligent questions that encourage people to talk about their work, their thoughts, and their concerns comfortably and openly. To accomplish this task with little effort, managers can have a prepared list of essential questions and use a questioning process to help their employees enhance their skills, reach solutions on their own, master their jobs, and understand and own their actions. This technique will improve your relationship with your employees. Also, it will reduce their dependency on you, giving you more time for your projects. In his recent book “The Coaching Habit - Say Less, Ask More & Change the Way You Lead Forever,” Michael Bungay Stanier, the first person honored as Coach of the Year in Canada, presents the vital seven coaching questions to teach managers how to coach effectively. This concept will help you become a successful coach with little strain. Read more →


The levels of disengagement in the workplace are growing fast. Some blame it to technology, newer people generations, an increase on stress levels, growth in job complexity or the perceived need to know everything instantly. This lack of engagement negatively impacts productivity, creativity, and profitability. What can leaders do to correct this startling concern effectively? In this article, I describe how leaders can make personal interactions and decisions to raise... Read more →


Stress and pressure are two different things. While some level of stress may be good for you, any level of pressure is usually harmful. It is extremely important to recognize and differentiate between these two feelings so that you can apply the correct solution techniques. Most of us are familiar with two types of stress. Positive stress, called eustress, is usually good for you. It motivates, focuses energy, feels exciting,... Read more →


Would you like to have two more hours per day? Personal time management is a key trait of successful people. They know how to achieve their goals in a fraction of the time that it takes most people. By learning and applying their techniques, we can also accomplish more in less time. Here are 22 time management tips that I am sure you’ll find very useful. First Decide If You... Read more →


Have you ever had a situation where you need to give a presentation in a short period, even in just 30 seconds? Imagine you want to present a great idea or a big problem to a senior executive. Perhaps you have spent a good amount of time preparing a formal 30-minute presentation complete with PowerPoint slides. What happens if the senior executive says something like, “I’ve got to go to... Read more →


In his book “Leading Geeks: How to Manage and Lead the People Who Deliver Technology,” Paul Glen explains that we cannot manage geeks the same way we manage other knowledge workers. The one-size-fits-all leadership approach won’t work. Then how should we manage geeks? What are the key differences? In the following paragraphs, I summarize the key cultural differences of technology teams, and what managers and leaders can do to create... Read more →


This technique can be used to deliver a persuasive presentation or speech. It uses a five-step pattern called Monroe’s Motivated Sequence and has been used successfully for political, sales, and marketing campaigns. It can also be used to sell your idea, initiative or project. The sequence is named after his creator Alan H. Monroe, who taught public speaking at Purdue University. Wouldn't it be nice to have this skill in... Read more →


Today more and more employees want to telecommute while some employers still prefer to have their whole staff working on-site, and this is a cause of significant concern for HR departments. We can argue about the pros and cons about telecommuting, but the truth is that employees from Generation Y (the Millennial generation, born from 1981 to 2000), and especially those in the technology industry and technology jobs are demanding... Read more →